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Asbestos Cancer Archives

Asbestos And Cancer

16: Asbestos And Cancer
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Asbestos Cancer: One Man’s Experience

Asbestos Cancer: One Man's Experience
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The book is a composite of information about the history of and the diseases caused by exposure to asbestos. Interwoven with a personal story, it includes the illness and subsequent death of the author’s father due to his asbestos exposure in an industrial setting. The author highlights asbestos as a carcinogen in our environment which was widely used without first being fully tested.

Asbestos exposure and laryngeal cancer: is there an association?(Editorial): An article from: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal

Asbestos exposure and laryngeal cancer: is there an association?(Editorial): An article from: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal
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This digital document is an article from Ear, Nose and Throat Journal, published by Vendome Group LLC on October 1, 2009. The length of the article is 1266 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.Citation DetailsTitle: Asbestos exposure and laryngeal cancer: is there an association?(Editorial)Author: Sidrah M. AhmadPublication: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal (Magazine/Journal)Date: October 1, 2009Publisher: Vendome Group LLCVolume: 88 Issue: 10 Page: 1140(2)Article Type: EditorialDistributed by Gale, a part… [Read More]

Asbestos: Selected Cancers

Asbestos: Selected Cancers
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In conjunction with drafting comprehensive legislation concerning compensation for health effects related to asbestos exposure (the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Act), the Senate Committee on the Judiciary directed the Institute of Medicine to assemble the Committee on Asbestos: Selected Health Effects. This committee was charged with addressing whether asbestos exposure is causally related to adverse health consequences in addition to asbestosis, mesothelioma, and lung cancer. Asbestos: Selected Cancers presents the committee’s comprehensive distillation of the peer-reviewed scientific and medical literature regarding association between asbestos and colorectal, laryngeal, esophageal, pharyngeal, and stomach cancers.

The Identification and Control of Environmental and Occupational Diseases: Asbestos and Cancers (Advances in modern environmental toxicology)

The Identification and Control of Environmental and Occupational Diseases: Asbestos and Cancers (Advances in modern environmental toxicology)
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The Identification and Control of Environmental and Occupational Diseases: Asbestos and Cancers (Advances in modern environmental toxicology).

Bilingual Vinyl Sign – Danger Asbestos Cancer And Lung Disease Hazard

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When Cancer Met Sally

When Cancer Met Sally
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ABC News Nightline A Killer in Town: Asbestos (2 DVD set)

ABC News Nightline A Killer in Town: Asbestos (2 DVD set)
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For decades Libby, Montana and the surrounding mountains were contaminated with tremolite asbestos, a particularly lethal and poisonous mineral, a byproduct of the town’s major industry, vermiculite mining. Thousands of people worked at the Zonolite mine north of town, breathing the dust that would eventually kill many — one slow, laborious breath at a time. Vermiculite was processed into products that have all sorts of applications in construction. Libby vermiculite was made into wall plaster, swimming pool liners, garden supplies, and above all, Zonolite attic insulation. So popular was Zonolite attic insulation that it is now in 15 to 35… [Read More]

Pleural thickening

Pleural thickening And Mesothelioma Chest Xray Tech

Author: http://www.HeartMedics.info

Pleural thickening may follow organization of a variety of inflammatory processes involving the pleura. These include infective pleural effusions, empyema, haemothorax, occupational exposure to asbestos or talc (see asbestosis, talcosis), rheumatoid lung disease, radiation therapy and drugs. Pleural thickening may also occur as a result of infiltration of the pleura by various malignant tumours, especially mesothelioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. It may be uni- or bilateral, diffuse or localized and may be calcified.

On the chest radiograph the changes predominantly affect the dependent areas with blunting of the costophrenic angle. Extensive pleural thickening produces volume loss and a veil-like reduction in transradiancy of the hemithorax. There is a soft tissue density medial to and paralleling the chest wall with a well-defined inner margin. There may be extension into the fissures which appear thickened. In contradistinction to pleural fluid the appearance remains constant on a decubitus radiograph.

Chest ultrasonography can be used to detect pleural thickening and distinguish it from pleural fluid but is only reliable if the pleura is more than 1 cm thick. The appearances are usually of a homogeneous echogenic layer between the chest wall and underlying lung.

CT is much more sensitive in detecting pleural thickening which is seen as a layer of soft tissue density between the chest wall and lungs (Fig.1). Thickening of as little as 1 – 2 mm can be detected with HRCT.

Pleural thickening is best assessed immediately internal to the ribs where there is normally no detectable soft tissue. Between the ribs the normal pleura and innermost intercostal muscle produce a thin line which should not be mistaken for pleural thickening. In the paravertebral region, any thickening of the pleural line is abnormal. In many diseases causing pleural thickening the layer of extrapleural fat between parietal pleura and chest wall is increased, allowing a subtle degree of thickening to be detected, especially with HRCT.
The distribution and shape of pleural thickening as determined by CT are useful for differentiating between benign and malignant causes of pleural thickening. The most useful signs in predicting the presence of malignancy are circumferential thickening, nodularity, thickening of greater than 1 cm and involvement of the mediastinal pleura.

Localized pleural thickening often occurs at the lung apices with increasing age, forming an apical cap. This may be uni- or bilateral and is usually of homogeneous, soft tissue density, usually less than 5 mm thick, with a well-defined inferior margin. It should be distinguished from a superior sulcus neoplasm. …

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